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Dealing with Feedback from your Teacher

Sometimes after receiving feedback, it can be hard to know exactly what to do with it to make the most of it. In addition, results can sometimes make you overlook valuable feedback and instead focus on the number. Here are some ways to treat feedback and results to make sure you maximize your improvement.

1. Read feedback as soon as possible.

As soon as you receive written feedback from your teacher, make sure to read it closely afterward. Sometimes this can be the last thing you want to do, because the mentality of “It’s over! I never want to see it again!” can kick in. This is hard, especially if it’s a mark you didn’t expect. Even if its not in class, find a good place where you can comprehensively go through it. This is to make sure its fresh in your mind, because picking it up months later not knowing what went wrong can make the whole process repeat over again.

2. Write down reoccurring issues.

For subjects like maths and science, keeping a Word document or a notebook for little tips and tricks that are personalized to your practice is a great way to improve. For example, when I was completing my Maths subject this semester for university, I kept a long list of tips for questions I would consistently get wrong- even if its something as simple as algebra misconceptions. This is a really useful habit to get into. And reviewing this document over the night before an exam is like a little cram session!

For the more lengthy, wordy subjects like History or English, do the same- but keep it more organized as things like structure and working on shaping ideas can be a bit more intense than a one-sentence tip. Annotating essays, or writing paragraphs on ideas that may need rethinking are ways that you can improve. In English, sorting out the base structure of an essay and a proper way to design it is crucial for success, and makes the writing process a whole lot easier.

3. Find ways to work through these.

With your collection of tips and tricks, it’s good to have worked examples if possible and review these every now and then to keep up the practice. For instance, if you know those 7 marker Biology questions on pracs is a struggle for you, then keep a few examples to review them and maybe even derive a set of steps on how you’ll approach these questions. If you have a time issue with English, have a way to practice becoming faster and different parts of the essay. Targeted practice for these little problem areas can be a bit improvement on your overall mark.

4. Stay positive!

Sometimes getting negative feedback on something that you worked hard for can be really tough. Accept that it’s inevitable – you will, at some point, get a mark during the HSC that you don’t really like the look of. But it’s what you do with this feedback that really makes the difference. It may not even matter number-wise in the end, so don’t stress out about it! It’s okay to feel disappointed, but know that you can always come back from it in some way.

Good luck!

For tutoring inquiries and questions, contact ash.negrone@gmail.com

Author: Ashlee Negrone

Ash studies Pre-Medicine at the University of Technology Sydney. She gradutated in 2016 with an ATAR of 95.3 with the subjects Biology, Adv English, PDHPE, English Ext 1, Design and Technology and Studies of Religion 2U.
Contact ash.negrone@gmail.com for tutoring inquiries.

Ashlee Negrone

Ash studies Pre-Medicine at the University of Technology Sydney. She gradutated in 2016 with an ATAR of 95.3 with the subjects Biology, Adv English, PDHPE, English Ext 1, Design and Technology and Studies of Religion 2U. Contact ash.negrone@gmail.com for tutoring inquiries.

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